lahoops:

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 

NATIONAL— Leaders of the undocumented youth movement in the United States have crossed the border into Mexico, and plan to turn themselves in alongside ‘DREAMers’ who left the United States at a border crossing next week. With applications for legal status in hand, they will demand to be allowed to return home to the United States.

Leaders currently in Mexico include Lizbeth Mateo of Los Angeles, CA and Lulu Martinez of Chicago, IL. Both have been living in the United States since before the age of 16, making them eligible for the DREAM Act and deferred action. “Last year they went after my uncle and he was deported, said Mateo. “What our family went through is what millions have gone through and it needs to stop. This administration needs to know we won’t wait for congress to do the right thing.”

NIYA activists have gone to great lengths to oppose detention and deportation; we have infiltrated detention centers and participated in acts of civil disobedience in order to challenge the president’s immigration policy. We will build a movement on the other side of the border, and plan to bring immigrant youth back home to the United States.

The fight to keep families together does not end after deportation. The President has 1.7 million broken promises to deal with. He’s going to deal with them now.

###

Visit http://theniya.org or NIYA FB

Check it out.

June 15, 2013. Today is the one year anniversary of DACA. I still can’t believe that one year ago we were sitting in Obama For America Offices demanding Obama to grant an Executive Order and stop deporting Dreamers.

It’s crazy to think how a bunch of sit-ins by undocumented youth all over the country could contribute so much to getting us a change in legislation.

I’m not going to say or claim that we got everyone DACA because we didn’t. We contributed to the already existing dialogue of the past work done by all these other immigrant activist who have been stopping DREAMer deportations and whatnot. But I will say this, we gave it the push it needed…

Regardless, there is still much work to be done (doesn’t end at DACA) but this seriously will always be one of my fondest memories.

Aw this is cute. When was this like 3 years ago? #obama #deporterinchief

Aw this is cute. When was this like 3 years ago? #obama #deporterinchief

tranqualizer:

DETAINED DURING A WORKING RAID: DON’T DEPORT THE SHOGUN 5!
On November 29, 2011, ICE raided the Shogun Buffet & Hibachi Grill in Asheville, North Carolina. They pulled out of a van and placed the restaurant on lockdown. In all, 12 workers were taken and put in deportation proceedings. Now 5 workers remain fighting their unjust deportations.According to the Morton Memo, the Shogun 5 (Flor, Audencio, Osvaldo, Jose, and Julio) are low priority cases and should not be deported. Make a phone call and sign the petition urging ICE to grant them discretion!TAKE ACTION: Make a Phone Call Call DC ICE – John Morton @ 202-732-3000 Call Charlotte ICE @ 704-672-6990Sample Script: “I am calling to urge ICE to stop the deportation of the Shogun 5 in North Carolina: Flor Funes (A# 89 955 708), Audencio Diaz (A# 89 951 976), Osvaldo Solis (A# 89 951 995), Jose Castillo (A# 89 951 978), and Julio Molina (A# 89 951 999). All 5 of them were detained at a raid at the Shogun Buffet, where they were victims of labor abuses and wage theft. They have been living in the U.S. for years. According to the Morton Memo, all 5 are low priority cases and should be granted prosecutorial discretion.”
SIGN THIS PETITION 

tranqualizer:

DETAINED DURING A WORKING RAID: DON’T DEPORT THE SHOGUN 5!

On November 29, 2011, ICE raided the Shogun Buffet & Hibachi Grill in Asheville, North Carolina. They pulled out of a van and placed the restaurant on lockdown. In all, 12 workers were taken and put in deportation proceedings. Now 5 workers remain fighting their unjust deportations.

According to the Morton Memo, the Shogun 5 (Flor, Audencio, Osvaldo, Jose, and Julio) are low priority cases and should not be deported. 

Make a phone call and sign the petition urging ICE to grant them discretion!


TAKE ACTION: Make a Phone Call 

Call DC ICE – John Morton @ 202-732-3000 

Call Charlotte ICE @ 704-672-6990

Sample Script: “I am calling to urge ICE to stop the deportation of the Shogun 5 in North Carolina: Flor Funes (A# 89 955 708), Audencio Diaz (A# 89 951 976), Osvaldo Solis (A# 89 951 995), Jose Castillo (A# 89 951 978), and Julio Molina (A# 89 951 999). All 5 of them were detained at a raid at the Shogun Buffet, where they were victims of labor abuses and wage theft. They have been living in the U.S. for years. According to the Morton Memo, all 5 are low priority cases and should be granted prosecutorial discretion.”

SIGN THIS PETITION 

More Deportations Brought To An Area Near You

theangy:

PLEASE TAKE A MOMENT TO CLICK ON THE PICTURE, READ THEIR STORY, SIGN, CALL AND SHARE.

IF YOU BELIEVE IN THE DREAM ACT, IN IMMIGRATION REFORM, IN EQUALITY AND JUSTICE, I HOPE YOU ALSO BELIEVE IN FAMILY REUNIFICATION AND STOPPING DEPORTATIONS.

TAKE ACTION!

1. Amado

Eight years ago, Amado came to the United States when he was just 17 years old. He was detained upon arrival, released, and soon thereafter, was given a 6-month workers permit. Because he was a minor at the time, Amado was not the recipient of the notice to appear in court, and when his court date came and went without his knowledge, he received an order for deportation in absentia.

2. Maria and Heriberto

On January 10th, 2013, Erika Andiola's home was raided by ICE agents looking for her mother Maria. Despite Erika telling the agents they did not have permission to enter they proceeded to detain her mother and brother, Heriberto, who was outside at the time.

3. Flavio

In August, Flavio was a front seat passenger in a car accident. It resulted with the top of the car embanked against a tree and both the driver and Flavio had to be cut out of the car. Flavio needed surgery that resulted in a left-sided colon resection. He is scheduled for follow-up surgery in nine months to have his colostomy reversed!

4. Rosa

Rosa is a workers' rights activist and community leader who is currently detained at the St. Clair County Jail facility. She came to the U.S. in 2000 seeking a better life.  She worked at a packaging plant where her rights were abused. She and her co-workers had their wages stolen and were exposed to harmful chemicals. She learned about her workplace rights and organized her co-workers to file a victorious lawsuit against their employer.

5. Shi Tong

On June 12, 2012, Mr. Chu was detained by ICE while on his way to make a delivery for the family restaurant he operates in Schenectady, New York. His three U.S. citizen children watched in horror from the restaurant windows as their father was taken into custody right before their eyes. They have not seen their father in four months

6. Jose Raul and Luis Raul

Luis dreams of going to college, earning a degree in automotive engineering, and eventually being able to own his personal car shop. Luis was arrested for street racing on November 19, 2010. He was held in McLennan County Detention Facility for two days and then transferred to ICE office in Waco. Because Luis was a minor, he was told to call a parent to pick him up when he was released.

7. Henry

Henry has been detained at Broward Transitional Center for nearly 4 months after he was arrested for driving without a license. He has no priors in his record.

thepeoplesrecord:

Nearly 205K deportations of parents of US citizens in just over two yearsDecember 17, 2012
The federal government conducted more than 200,000 deportations of parents who said their children are U.S. citizens in a timespan of just over two years, according to new data obtained by Colorlines.com. The figures represent the longest view to date of the scale of parental deportation.
Between July 1, 2010, and Sept. 31, 2012, nearly 23 percent of all deportations—or, 204,810 deportations—were issued for parents with citizen children, according to federal data unearthed through a Freedom of Information Act request. [See the full data set here.]
Because some people may have been deported more than once in the time period, the data represents total deportations conducted, not the number of individuals removed from the country. However, experts say that the total number of deportations of parents may be higher because some mothers and fathers fear telling authorities that they have kids. An additional group of parents whose kids are not U.S. citizens are not reflected in the numbers.
“We are in a crisis situation in which we need to start taking action immediately to prevent these needless and often-times permanent separations of American children from their families,” California Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard said in an interview with Colorlines.com. Roybal-Allard, a member of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, introduced legislation last year that would protect detained and deported immigrant parents from losing their children.As Congress and the White House promise immigration reform legislation in the new year, the numbers raise questions about the impact of the government’s immigration policies on families and about what happens to the children whose mothers and fathers are deported from the United States.
“We have to make sure that all children are protected,” Roybal-Allard said. “We’re talking about U.S. citizens; their pleas and cries for help are pretty much being ignored at this point.”
Congress in 2009 ordered Immigration and Customs Enforcement to compile data on parental deportation beginning on July 1, 2010, and to release it every six months. Since then, however, the federal government has released the figures just once, and only for the first six months of 2011.
The new data includes all deported mothers and fathers who reported having U.S.-citizen kids since July 1, 2010, including those in the previously reported six-month period. Rates of parental deportation have remained more or less level since the government began collecting the data, and annually, more than 90,000 parents with U.S.-citizen kids are removed from the United States.
Families Torn Apart
Questions remain about what happens to the children of deportees.
“We don’t know how many [children] stay here and how many go with their parents,” said Luis H. Zayas, the dean of the University of Texas School of Social Work who is at work on a federally funded study on the mental health impacts on children when mothers and fathers are deported
“We know there are traumatic effects on the kids,” Zayas added. “We are talking about separating families from children. That’s not something our government should be doing.”
Zayas said that when children follow their parents to Mexico, the country where most deportees are from, they often struggle with stigma and deep poverty. “Many of their parents fled poverty, fled government oppression and when they return, they return to these origins. That puts kids at risk.”
It’s clear, however, that a disturbing number of children are separated from their families for significant stretches of time, and some permanently. A Colorlines.com investigation released in November 2011 estimated that there were at least 5,100 children in foster care who faced significant barriers to reunifying with their detained and deported parents. We projected that if deportation and child welfare policies remained unchanged, another 15,000 kids could face a similar fate over the three years between 2012 and 2014.
Among them were the children of Felipe Montes, an undocumented Mexican immigrant who was deported from his home in North Carolina in December 2010 because he had racked up a series of driving violations. He left behind three young U.S.-citizen children and a wife, Marie Montes. The kids initially remained with their mother, but Felipe Montes had been the primary caretaker and wage earner in the family and without the support of her husband the county child welfare department soon determined that Marie Montes, who had long struggled with mental illness and drug abuse, could not care for them. The three young boys were shuttled into foster care with couples who hoped to adopt them and the child welfare department refused to reunite the kids with their father in Mexico.
Last month, after a long court battle that drew national attention, a state judge in North Carolina granted Montes custody of his three kids. The 32-year-old father expects to take them with him to Mexico after the child welfare case is closed as planned in February.
The Administration’s ‘Discretion’
The new figures show that rates of parental deportation have remained largely level since Congress ordered ICE to begin collecting the data, quashing hopes from some advocates that the agency’s 2011 “prosecutorial discretion” guidelines would lead to a decline in these removals.
The guidelines, released on June 17, 2011, in a memo from ICE director John Morton, instructed ICE agents to focus deportation efforts on people with serious criminal convictions, those picked up crossing the border into the U.S., and those who had previously been deported from the country.
The memo also ordered agents making deportation decisions to weigh “the person’s ties and contributions to the community, including family relationships,” and “whether the person has a U.S. citizen or permanent resident spouse, child, or parent.”
In answer to questions about the parental deportation data, ICE officials told Colorlines.com the continued pace of deportations does not reflect a failure to implement prosecutorial discretion, because most deported parents have other factors weighing against them.
“Evaluation of this data in the past has repeatedly shown that the overwhelming majority of these individuals have significant criminal and/or immigration histories placing them within ICE’s enforcement priorities,” wrote agency spokesperson Gillian Christensen in an emailed statement, “therefore making them ineligible for an exercise of prosecutorial discretion.”
In April, the Arizona Republic reported over 74 percent of deported parents had been convicted of crimes, according to ICE figures. Another 13 percent had been deported previously.
But the devil is in the details. And the question for parental deportation is the same as for other groups the federal government have said are criminals: what’s considered “significant” criminal background? Figures on deportations though the Secure Communities, an ICE program that picks up immigrants in local jails, reveals that nearly 40 percent of deportees with convictions were charged with the lowest level crimes, including driving offenses.
Advocates note that regardless of whether a deported mother or father falls into one of the government’s priority groups, the impact on their kids the same. “Any deportation of a parent is a horrible thing for the child,” said Emily Butera, senior program officer at the Women’s Refugee Commission who advocates in Washington for greater protections for these families. “The reason for the deportation is immaterial for the kid.”
Officials say they’ve made strides to protect parents who fall outside of their target populations and are the primary caretakers for children.
“ICE works with individuals in removal proceedings to ensure they have ample opportunity to make important decisions regarding the care and custody of their children,” Christensen noted. “ICE is sensitive to the fact that encountering those who violate our immigration laws may impact families.”
As a sign of this, agency officials point to Felipe Montes, to whom the agency granted a rare “humanitarian parole” to reenter the country in August so that he could attend court hearings on his parental rights.
But immigration attorneys say the Montes case is a rare exception and that few, if any other deported parents have the opportunity to come back. Meanwhile, attorneys say that immigrants held in immigration detention centers continue to struggle to maintain contact with their children.
The data does show a slight decline in the number of parental deportations in the most recently reported three month period. From July until September of this year, ICE deported 20,878 parents, about 10 percent less than average. The overall deportation numbers for August to September of this year have yet to be released however, so it’s impossible to know whether this also marks a decline in the larger rate of deportation.
One reason for the small decline could be that in recent months, ICE appears to have had less luck getting judges to order the deportation of parents. Before January of this year, ICE was able to obtain deportation orders from immigration judges in 50 to 58 percent of cases. Since April, courts have handed down deportation orders in fewer than 43 percent of cases.
Concern over what happens to the children of deportees is now squarely at the center of recent advocacy and congressional promises about an immigration reform bill likely to be introduced next year. Last week, dozens of children, some whose own parents have been deported, arrived on Capitol Hill to deliver boxes of letters from other kids asking Congress to stop deporting parents. The “We Belong Together” campaign, as the effort convened by several advocacy groups is called, aims to call attention to the impact of deportations on kids.
White House officials and members of Congress have promised to push an immigration reform bill early next year, after deliberations over the “fiscal cliff” settle. Rep. Roybal-Allard, who joined a briefing with the group of children last week, told Colorlines.com that she and other members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus are demanding that any comprehensive immigration reform bill focus on family unity. She wants the bill she introduced last year, the Help Separated Families Act, to be folded into the comprehensive immigration legislation passed by Congress. The bill would provide protections for deported parents and for undocumented family members who care for their young relatives
“There needs to be a path to citizenship for those here, and there needs to be provision to keep families together,” she said. “I’m not sure that my colleagues in general are aware of the information that you are now bringing to light.”
Source

thepeoplesrecord:

Nearly 205K deportations of parents of US citizens in just over two years
December 17, 2012

The federal government conducted more than 200,000 deportations of parents who said their children are U.S. citizens in a timespan of just over two years, according to new data obtained by Colorlines.com. The figures represent the longest view to date of the scale of parental deportation.

Between July 1, 2010, and Sept. 31, 2012, nearly 23 percent of all deportations—or, 204,810 deportations—were issued for parents with citizen children, according to federal data unearthed through a Freedom of Information Act request. [See the full data set here.]

Because some people may have been deported more than once in the time period, the data represents total deportations conducted, not the number of individuals removed from the country. However, experts say that the total number of deportations of parents may be higher because some mothers and fathers fear telling authorities that they have kids. An additional group of parents whose kids are not U.S. citizens are not reflected in the numbers.

“We are in a crisis situation in which we need to start taking action immediately to prevent these needless and often-times permanent separations of American children from their families,” California Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard said in an interview with Colorlines.com. Roybal-Allard, a member of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, introduced legislation last year that would protect detained and deported immigrant parents from losing their children.As Congress and the White House promise immigration reform legislation in the new year, the numbers raise questions about the impact of the government’s immigration policies on families and about what happens to the children whose mothers and fathers are deported from the United States.

“We have to make sure that all children are protected,” Roybal-Allard said. “We’re talking about U.S. citizens; their pleas and cries for help are pretty much being ignored at this point.”

Congress in 2009 ordered Immigration and Customs Enforcement to compile data on parental deportation beginning on July 1, 2010, and to release it every six months. Since then, however, the federal government has released the figures just once, and only for the first six months of 2011.

The new data includes all deported mothers and fathers who reported having U.S.-citizen kids since July 1, 2010, including those in the previously reported six-month period. Rates of parental deportation have remained more or less level since the government began collecting the data, and annually, more than 90,000 parents with U.S.-citizen kids are removed from the United States.

Families Torn Apart

Questions remain about what happens to the children of deportees.

“We don’t know how many [children] stay here and how many go with their parents,” said Luis H. Zayas, the dean of the University of Texas School of Social Work who is at work on a federally funded study on the mental health impacts on children when mothers and fathers are deported

“We know there are traumatic effects on the kids,” Zayas added. “We are talking about separating families from children. That’s not something our government should be doing.”

Zayas said that when children follow their parents to Mexico, the country where most deportees are from, they often struggle with stigma and deep poverty. “Many of their parents fled poverty, fled government oppression and when they return, they return to these origins. That puts kids at risk.”

It’s clear, however, that a disturbing number of children are separated from their families for significant stretches of time, and some permanently. A Colorlines.com investigation released in November 2011 estimated that there were at least 5,100 children in foster care who faced significant barriers to reunifying with their detained and deported parents. We projected that if deportation and child welfare policies remained unchanged, another 15,000 kids could face a similar fate over the three years between 2012 and 2014.

Among them were the children of Felipe Montes, an undocumented Mexican immigrant who was deported from his home in North Carolina in December 2010 because he had racked up a series of driving violations. He left behind three young U.S.-citizen children and a wife, Marie Montes. The kids initially remained with their mother, but Felipe Montes had been the primary caretaker and wage earner in the family and without the support of her husband the county child welfare department soon determined that Marie Montes, who had long struggled with mental illness and drug abuse, could not care for them. The three young boys were shuttled into foster care with couples who hoped to adopt them and the child welfare department refused to reunite the kids with their father in Mexico.

Last month, after a long court battle that drew national attention, a state judge in North Carolina granted Montes custody of his three kids. The 32-year-old father expects to take them with him to Mexico after the child welfare case is closed as planned in February.

The Administration’s ‘Discretion’

The new figures show that rates of parental deportation have remained largely level since Congress ordered ICE to begin collecting the data, quashing hopes from some advocates that the agency’s 2011 “prosecutorial discretion” guidelines would lead to a decline in these removals.

The guidelines, released on June 17, 2011, in a memo from ICE director John Morton, instructed ICE agents to focus deportation efforts on people with serious criminal convictions, those picked up crossing the border into the U.S., and those who had previously been deported from the country.

The memo also ordered agents making deportation decisions to weigh “the person’s ties and contributions to the community, including family relationships,” and “whether the person has a U.S. citizen or permanent resident spouse, child, or parent.”

In answer to questions about the parental deportation data, ICE officials told Colorlines.com the continued pace of deportations does not reflect a failure to implement prosecutorial discretion, because most deported parents have other factors weighing against them.

“Evaluation of this data in the past has repeatedly shown that the overwhelming majority of these individuals have significant criminal and/or immigration histories placing them within ICE’s enforcement priorities,” wrote agency spokesperson Gillian Christensen in an emailed statement, “therefore making them ineligible for an exercise of prosecutorial discretion.”

In April, the Arizona Republic reported over 74 percent of deported parents had been convicted of crimes, according to ICE figures. Another 13 percent had been deported previously.

But the devil is in the details. And the question for parental deportation is the same as for other groups the federal government have said are criminals: what’s considered “significant” criminal background? Figures on deportations though the Secure Communities, an ICE program that picks up immigrants in local jails, reveals that nearly 40 percent of deportees with convictions were charged with the lowest level crimes, including driving offenses.

Advocates note that regardless of whether a deported mother or father falls into one of the government’s priority groups, the impact on their kids the same. “Any deportation of a parent is a horrible thing for the child,” said Emily Butera, senior program officer at the Women’s Refugee Commission who advocates in Washington for greater protections for these families. “The reason for the deportation is immaterial for the kid.”

Officials say they’ve made strides to protect parents who fall outside of their target populations and are the primary caretakers for children.

“ICE works with individuals in removal proceedings to ensure they have ample opportunity to make important decisions regarding the care and custody of their children,” Christensen noted. “ICE is sensitive to the fact that encountering those who violate our immigration laws may impact families.”

As a sign of this, agency officials point to Felipe Montes, to whom the agency granted a rare “humanitarian parole” to reenter the country in August so that he could attend court hearings on his parental rights.

But immigration attorneys say the Montes case is a rare exception and that few, if any other deported parents have the opportunity to come back. Meanwhile, attorneys say that immigrants held in immigration detention centers continue to struggle to maintain contact with their children.

The data does show a slight decline in the number of parental deportations in the most recently reported three month period. From July until September of this year, ICE deported 20,878 parents, about 10 percent less than average. The overall deportation numbers for August to September of this year have yet to be released however, so it’s impossible to know whether this also marks a decline in the larger rate of deportation.

One reason for the small decline could be that in recent months, ICE appears to have had less luck getting judges to order the deportation of parents. Before January of this year, ICE was able to obtain deportation orders from immigration judges in 50 to 58 percent of cases. Since April, courts have handed down deportation orders in fewer than 43 percent of cases.

Concern over what happens to the children of deportees is now squarely at the center of recent advocacy and congressional promises about an immigration reform bill likely to be introduced next year. Last week, dozens of children, some whose own parents have been deported, arrived on Capitol Hill to deliver boxes of letters from other kids asking Congress to stop deporting parents. The “We Belong Together” campaign, as the effort convened by several advocacy groups is called, aims to call attention to the impact of deportations on kids.

White House officials and members of Congress have promised to push an immigration reform bill early next year, after deliberations over the “fiscal cliff” settle. Rep. Roybal-Allard, who joined a briefing with the group of children last week, told Colorlines.com that she and other members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus are demanding that any comprehensive immigration reform bill focus on family unity. She wants the bill she introduced last year, the Help Separated Families Act, to be folded into the comprehensive immigration legislation passed by Congress. The bill would provide protections for deported parents and for undocumented family members who care for their young relatives

“There needs to be a path to citizenship for those here, and there needs to be provision to keep families together,” she said. “I’m not sure that my colleagues in general are aware of the information that you are now bringing to light.”

Source

I didnt #vote because I #illegal but #Obama still #deportin’

I didnt #vote because I #illegal but #Obama still #deportin’

le-kif-kif:

PLEASE REBLOG WIDELY!!

The LGBT Dreamers Fund will provide a financial assistance scholarship to undocumented lesbian, gay, bisexual and/or transgender-identified individuals who qualify for the deferred action policy to help them pay the costs of the application process (now set at $465 per person).

After filling out all of the required fields below, your application will be reviewed to see if you qualify for aid.  You will be contacted no later than October 31, 2012 if you have received the scholarship.

Ya’ll— remember when Obama said he’d let undocumented youth get work permits and protection? Well for thousands, that $465 fee is killing them. Please promote this so queer immigrants have a chance to realize their DREAMs!!

Dassit! Some money for the fab. undocuqueers! :)

le-kif-kif:

epicinvain:

i have questions about immigration policy.

i understand people being upset about the deportation numbers. it’s likely that i would  be very upset if i had a closer tie to the affected groups. 

that said, what do people WANT from the (orany) president, action (i.e., legislation)-wise when it comes to DREAMers? 

1- cease and desist the pattern of ramping up deportations which has been aggressively promoted by obama through budgeting

2- end 287G communities and S-Comm programs across the country

3- release all DACA eligible youth from detention facilities; actually enforce DACA everywhere; and allow the family members of undocumented youth and other undocumented adults the same sort of safeguards from deportation

4- aggressively push immigration reform

there are other things but these are the most obvious

le-kif-kif:

reallifedocumentarian:

While the Dems run in circles to congratulate themselves for totes being all about undocufolk…
This is what they did today.
This is Inga and her 5 year old [US citizen] son. Inga was kept in a detention center, Broward Transitional Center to be precise, for the past 2.5 years.
Yeah, do that math…
Despite being a survivor of domestic violence with a work permit and an application to adjust her status through her sister… President Obama and his administration deported her.
All these pro-migrant platitudes just make me want to throw up right now….

remember dreamers! these are the same people who arrested 10 innocent undocumented people- folks who could have been your parents, your uncles, your cousins, your neighbors.
good on benny and good on michelle obama but shit aint changed all that much.

le-kif-kif:

reallifedocumentarian:

While the Dems run in circles to congratulate themselves for totes being all about undocufolk…

This is what they did today.

This is Inga and her 5 year old [US citizen] son. Inga was kept in a detention center, Broward Transitional Center to be precise, for the past 2.5 years.

Yeah, do that math…

Despite being a survivor of domestic violence with a work permit and an application to adjust her status through her sister… President Obama and his administration deported her.

All these pro-migrant platitudes just make me want to throw up right now….

remember dreamers! these are the same people who arrested 10 innocent undocumented people- folks who could have been your parents, your uncles, your cousins, your neighbors.

good on benny and good on michelle obama but shit aint changed all that much.

univisionnews:

Viridiana Martinez, a NIYA organizer, put herself in deportation proceedings to infiltrate a detention center in Broward County, South Florida.

By ALBERT SABATÉ

Undocumented immigration activists infiltrated an Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detention facility in Southern Florida to conduct an undercover investigation. They claim to have found more than 100 low priority cases of people who, according to recent policies of the Obama administration, should be released.

Read More

kpseesee:

Today Obama announced that some undocumented young immigrants won’t be facing deportation anytime soon.  If they meet certain criteria the undocumented immigrants can be granted deferred action and eventually get work permits. The move will affect an estimated 800,000 people in the states and many of them reside here in Los Angeles. KPCC’s Mae Ryan photographed students in LA who will be directly affected by this policy.  Read more about the new policy here.

Some of the folks photographs are friends of mine. check them out. They’re the Los Angeles Immigrant Youth Coalition.

Undocumented youth and Dreamers! This is for you!

tranqualizer:

cosmopolitan-fascist:

cosmopolitan-fascist:

There are community townhalls taking place across the entire country where you can speak to lawyers and activists who helped bring about the new change in immigration policy.

Be ware of lawyers and immigration agents who want to charge money for help: there is nothing to be done until August when DHS will release directions and applications for work permits and deferred action.We in the activist community are working tirelessly across the country to bring you accurate and up to date information.

Get the right info straight from the source and to plug in to a Dream Act org near you. To find a townhall in your community, please go here.

PLEASE REBLOG SO THAT UNDOCUMENTED YOUTH CAN OBTAIN THIS VITAL INFORMATION.

Austin, TEXAS just had its FIRST FORUM and over 400 people showed up!!

It has been an amazing experience helping the Latino community get informed (and really hard since I don’t speak a lick of Spanish).

To all my followers: go out and do something for your communities.

Haaay, same here in Charlotte! 

The ones in California have been a big hit too.

Also I should mention it shouldn’t only be the Latino community getting informed on this, other undocumented communities need to know about this. There needs to be more info in other languages. I know there was one in Tagalog and just recently saw one about a forum in Korean.

mohandasgandhi:

undoneattheseams:

Is anyone gonna tell these people that Canada uses provincial government healthcare systems and public health insurance or is everyone just going to sit back and watch these people make asses of themselves?
Wait, don’t answer that.

#White whine

Ohmygod.  #whitewhine is the perfect tag for this.

mohandasgandhi:

undoneattheseams:

Is anyone gonna tell these people that Canada uses provincial government healthcare systems and public health insurance or is everyone just going to sit back and watch these people make asses of themselves?

Wait, don’t answer that.

#White whine

Ohmygod.  #whitewhine is the perfect tag for this.

Presidential History Fail

reallifedocumentarian:

From President Obama’s Cesar Chavez Day Proclamation in 2012:

Alongside Dolores Huerta, he founded the United Farm Workers of America (UFW), an organization tasked with defending and empowering the men and women who feed the world.”

ummm….

Thanks for forgetting the APIA leaders who worked with Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta to found UFW. Those two guys up there, for example. Philip Vera Cruz and Larry Itliong. You know, two of the leaders that started the Delano Grape Strike you mention in the proclamation before Chavez joined with Filipino farmworkers. Not to take away props from Chavez and Huerta, but Larry Itliong was the second in charge and pretty instrumental to the history you’re rightfully celebrating. APIA outreach fail….


maybe i’m jaded. maybe.